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new teachers. Married to one of the first Black engineers to work for Boeing, Soror Motin was also a founding member of the Engineers’ Wives’ Club. Soror Motin wore the Delta symbol as she performed public service. She volunteered for Medina Children Services and the Washington State Bar Disciplinary Board. She was a deacon in her church and served as a tutor, choir member and storyteller. Members of the Seattle Alumnae Chapter sang the “Sweetheart Song” at Soror Motin’s memorial service so her church family could hear the loving legacy she gave to her sorority. s Honorary Member Gloria Naylor entered the Omega Omega Chapter Oct. 5, 2016 near her home in Christiansted, Virgin Islands. She was s74 DELTA SIGMA THETA SORORITY, INC. 312.297.9600 MECHANICAL T:7.5” CLIENT APPROVAL JOB NUMBER AARP AARCO17021 FILE NAME: AARCO17021_m01v00_7.5x5_DeltaAd.indd DESCRIPTION: DELTA AD T:5” Keep uplifting others and taking care of your family, your health, your wealth, your Delta sisters, and yourself. Go to aarp.org/blackcommunity Real Possibilities is a trademark of AARP® 66. She is considered one of the most talented contemporary novelists of the 20th century. Soror Naylor was a short story writer and novelist born in Brooklyn, New York in 1960. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Brooklyn College (CCNY) and a master’s in African American studies from Yale University. She taught at George Washington University, New York University, Boston University, and Cornell University. She achieved national acclaim upon publication of “The Women of Brewster Place” which won the American Book Award for first fiction novel in 1983. In 1989, Oprah Winfrey produced a miniseries based on this novel. Its success led to the creation of the network dramatic series, “Brewster Place,” in 1990. The writing of Naylor’s third novel, “Mama Day,” a compelling generational saga of pride, pain, and woman healing, was supported with a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1989. She was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 1988. Naylor’s other books include “Linden Hills” (1985), a depiction of upwardly mobile black suburban life with echoes of Dante’s “Inferno”; “Bailey’s Cafe” (1992), a look at the complicated dance of patrons and purveyors at a greasy spoon in 1940s Brooklyn; and “The Men of Brewster Place” (1998), in which she fleshed out the ancillary stories of the men who appeared in her earlier novel. She was initiated into the Sorority in 1994 during the 42nd National Convention in St. Louis. s


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