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JOURNAL Winter 2017 s73 Omega Omega Soror Frances M. Flippen entered the Omega Omega Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority in May 2017. The Washington DC Alumnae Chapter performed the Omega Omega service May 23, 2017 for our beloved soror, a former deputy director at the Sorority’s National Headquarters (1973 – 1980). Soror Flippen was a native of Beckley, W.Va. and taught in the Raleigh County School System for a number of years. She was a charter member of the Beckley Alumnae Chapter and served as Midwest Regional Director (1960 – 1964). Soror Flippen received a Bachelor of Science degree from West Virginia State College and a Master of Arts degree from New York University. She also studied at West Virginia and Columbia universities. She taught secondary education in the Beckley public school system. Soror Flippen was initiated into the Sorority through the Alpha Delta Chapter at West Virginia State University in 1936. She was also a member of National Education Association, American Association of University Women, the NAACP, The Links, Inc., American Legion Auxiliary, and the Alpha Wives Association. She was on the executive board of the local NAACP and volunteered her time at the Heart Fund and the Mental Health Association. s Renowned journalist, award-winning political reporter and author, Honorary Member Gwen Ifill, made her transition to the Omega Omega Chapter November 14, 2016. A native New Yorker, Ifill broke through barriers obstructing the advancement of African-American women in journalism to become the first African American woman to host a major political talk show when she signed onto PBS’ “Washington Week” as moderator and managing editor. Ifill died at a hospice facility surrounded by family and friends. She was 61. Soror Ifill was also the co-anchor and co-managing editor, with Judy Woodruff, of “PBS NewsHour.” In 2009, she authored the book, “The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama,” which highlighted the impact of President Barack Obama’s historic election and discussed the rise of young African Americans into the realm of politics. Prior to joining PBS in 1999, Ifill was chief congressional and political correspondent for “NBC News,” White House correspondent for “The New York Times,” and political reporter for “The Washington Post.” She also worked at the “Baltimore Evening Sun” and the “Boston Herald American.” Ifill was also recognized for her coverage of seven presidential campaigns and for serving as moderator during vice presidential debates between Dick Cheney and John Edwards in 2004 and the 2008 debate between Joe Biden and Sarah Palin. Ifill used her platform to lead numerous public conversations and town halls shedding light and awareness on issues facing the country. In September 2015, she moderated “America After Charleston,” following the shooting deaths of nine African American parishioners by a white male gunman in Charleston, South Carolina’s Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. In September 2014, she moderated “America After Ferguson,” discussing the many issues facing communities in the wake of Michael Brown’s death in Ferguson, Missouri. She received more than 20 honorary doctorates and served on the boards of the News Literacy Project, the Committee to Protect Journalists, and was a fellow with the American Academy of Sciences. In 2015 she was awarded the National Press Club’s highest honor, the Fourth Estate Award. She was also honored for her work as a journalist by the Radio and Television News Directors Association, Harvard’s Joan Shorenstein Center, The National Association of Black Journalists, Ohio University, Boston’s Ford Hall Forum, and she was included in “Ebony Magazine’s” list of 150 Most Influential African-Americans, among many other honors. Ifill graduated from Simmons College in Boston. She was initiated into Delta Sigma Theta during Delta Days in the Nation’s Capital in Washington, D.C. in February 2011. She was preceded in death by her brother Oliver Ifill, Jr; and she is survived by her brothers Roberto Ifill, of Silver Spring, Maryland and Rev. Earle Ifill of Atlanta; and a sister, Maria Philip, also of Silver Spring and a member of Delta Sigma Theta. s A Delta sweetheart, Soror June Mack Motin, transitioned into the Omega Omega Chapter on June 15, 2017. Soror Motin and her soror-friend, Dorothy Jean Swope wrote the Delta “Sweetheart Song.” Soror Motin was an outstanding educator for Seattle Public Schools and the first African-American demonstration teacher assigned to support


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